Home > Spanish, tapas > Salt Tapas & Bar, Foodbar Dada. Worries and Talking To God.

Salt Tapas & Bar, Foodbar Dada. Worries and Talking To God.

Only a small-plates dinner venue would cater to both the ravenous and the only-slightly-peckish. Which is how we ended up at Salt Tapas & Bar by Luke Mangan (Raffles City Shopping Centre).

Salt Tapas & Bar by Luke Mangan, Raffles City Shopping Centre Salt Tapas & Bar by Luke Mangan, Raffles City Shopping Centre
Salt Tapas & Bar by Luke Mangan, Raffles City Shopping Centre Salt Tapas & Bar by Luke Mangan, Raffles City Shopping Centre
Salt Tapas & Bar by Luke Mangan, Raffles City Shopping Centre Salt Tapas & Bar by Luke Mangan, Raffles City Shopping Centre
Salt Tapas & Bar by Luke Mangan, Raffles City Shopping Centre

Lovely feel to it. We supposed the juxtaposition of usual industrial-chic x warm brick walls x authentic Spanish tiles meant to mirror the casual “modern Spanish with an Australian twist” tapas.

Salt Tapas & Bar by Luke Mangan, Raffles City Shopping Centre
Salt Tapas & Bar by Luke Mangan, Raffles City Shopping Centre Salt Tapas & Bar by Luke Mangan, Raffles City Shopping Centre

We didn’t get far down the menu, having only the rocket, parmesan, caramelised walnut and pear salad; and the tagine of snapper and octopus, chickpeas, silverbeet, date and lemon (liked this – good mix of flavours: Middle Eastern references, octopus not rubbery) before heading off in search of bartenders mixologists from the sadly defunct Klee Bar.

Foodbar Dada, 60 Robertson Quay Foodbar Dada, 60 Robertson Quay
Foodbar Dada, 60 Robertson Quay Menu. Foodbar Dada, 60 Robertson Quay
Wednesday's menu. Foodbar Dada, 60 Robertson Quay Foodbar Dada, 60 Robertson Quay

One was rumoured to mix at Foodbar Dada (facebook, 60 Roberston Quay), so off we went. Behind a nondescript exterior next to Smitten Coffee & Tea Bar, a small-seater with industrial salvage wood retro setup.

Spanish Omelette: Prawns and Asparagus. Foodbar Dada, 60 Robertson Quay Dada croquettes with some miso thing. Foodbar Dada, 60 Robertson Quay
Foodbar Dada, 60 Robertson Quay Foodbar Dada, 60 Robertson Quay

The dude on duty didn’t look familiar, but we were pleased with the food: the Spanish omelette with prawns and asparagus was already sitting on the bar waiting to be sliced, Dada croquettes accompanied by moro miso?, Josper squid with egg (the bread was unnecessary),

Foodbar Dada, 60 Robertson Quay Foodbar Dada, 60 Robertson Quay
Foodbar Dada, 60 Robertson Quay Foodbar Dada, 60 Robertson Quay

Escalivada Pintxo – roasted eggplant, specially-imported anchovies, dehydrated olives, roasted red pepper mousse, and much fun watching the tapas being assembled at the counter.

Foodbar Dada, 60 Robertson QuayEverything seemed so natural (the selling point of the joint being that the daily menu depends on what Spanish chef Manel Valero finds at the wet market that morning) that it was somewhat of a surprise to spot cans of Albert and Ferran Adria’s Texturas overhead. Would dearly love to play with the emulsifiers and the spherification stuff.

Foodbar Dada, 60 Robertson Quay
Foodbar Dada, 60 Robertson Quay Foodbar Dada, 60 Robertson Quay

“Bespoke” cocktails didn’t turn out too bad. In the same vein as Klee, the customer is to tell the mixologist preferred flavours/textures and he’ll do something appropriately tasty with fresh fruit (juice).

Unfortunately, while anxieties may have their edge temporarily dulled by good food and drink and company though, they merely retreat into the background to rear their worrisome heads when you’re alone in the darker reaches of the night.

The day before, we were doing the chapter on “Talking to God” in Matthias Media‘s Back To Basics. The verse was Philippians 4:6-7:

Do not be anxious about anything, but in everything, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your requests to God. And the peace of God, which transcends all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.

Q: So why not be anxious about anything?

  • It is not about being holier-than-thou and claiming that nothing fazes us; we are titanium etc. It is human to worry about things. After all, we are not in complete control of our future, and it is foolish to think that we are. The rich man who told his soul to rest and relax on the basis of good revenue in agricultural produce that year was called a fool by God because his life would be demanded of him that day (Luke 12:16:-20). So life does not consist in the abundance of one’s possession and so we can’t find security in them.
    Celine bag and Ling Wu's Iggy's Girlfriend. Foodbar Dada, 60 Robertson Quay
  • We worry because we can’t see what’s in the future, we are not sure that we will get what we want, we are afraid of what might come upon us.
  • But worrying is pointless since no one can even add a single hour to their span of life. If we can’t even do a small thing like that, why worry about the rest? (Luke 12:26)

Q: Why present our requests to God?

  • because God knows how to take care of us and knows our needs – if he can feed the ravens who neither sow nor reap, and grow the lilies even though they neither toil nor spin, and clothe the grass that has only a brief life, he will certainly know what we need and give them to us if our lives are not focused on these things but on God’s kingdom (Luke 12:22-34);
  • because God is in control of everything in this universe down to the most minor detail – each of the sparrows that are sold five for two pennies in the market, and the number of hairs on our head (Luke 12:4-7);
  • because not only does God have the knowledge of our needs and ability to fulfil them, it is his good pleasure to do so now and more in the next life (Luke 12:32). If even human fathers, who are self-centred and self-worshipping, will not give their child a serpent when he asks for a fish, how much more will the heavenly Father give good things (in this case the Holy Spirit) to those who ask him (Luke 11:5-13)?

Q: What outcome should we expect from our bringing our requests to God?

  • There is no promise that our requests will definitely be granted (therefore, no promise that we will be healed or that we will get the job or husband/wife/house/dog/cat/car we want, even if we had “faith”); rather, the promise is that the peace of God will guard our hearts and minds in Christ Jesus.
  • This peace of God cannot refer to the reasoning used by some to back up their decisions, that “I’m sure this is God’s will for me because i felt such peace in my heart when i decided”. Jesus in the Garden of Gethsemane wasn’t feeling particularly at peace with what he knew to be God’s will that he should die on the cross for the sins of the world, but he decided to be obedient to God.
  • In the context of the passage, this peace is probably the opposite of being anxious, that is, this is the peace that trusts that God is in control, God knows our needs, and will always act for the good of those who love him. This preserves and protects us to keep on going in Christ, because we understand that he is still trustworthy.
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  1. May 28, 2012 at 6:07 am

    One of the partners of the Klee is now at Bar Stories. Enjoy! 🙂

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