Home > coffee, Working the Ground for Food > MU Parlour, Strangers’ Reunion, Fraud and Truth

MU Parlour, Strangers’ Reunion, Fraud and Truth

Last week, with China closed for Ching Ming/Qingming, finally got round to spending some time with India, Sri Lanka, Indonesia, Japan, and Vietnam, and watching the Myanmar elections, and having strange vivid dreams about attending the official show-and-tell of North Korea’s rockets. Then back to China this week for insider news on political maneuverings, and also updates from the US on the whole Rudy Kurniawan wine fraud saga.

In the midst of all this, was pleased to have wandered into two new cafes/coffee places:

Exterior, Mu Parlour, Lorong Mambong, Holland Village Mu Parlour, Lorong Mambong, Holland Village
Interior, Mu Parlour, Lorong Mambong, Holland Village Interior, Mu Parlour, Lorong Mambong, Holland Village
Interior, Mu Parlour, Lorong Mambong, Holland Village Interior, Mu Parlour, Lorong Mambong, Holland Village
Washbasin, Mu Parlour, Lorong Mambong, Holland Village Interior, Mu Parlour, Lorong Mambong, Holland Village
Flat White and Blackberry cheesecake, Mu Parlour, Lorong Mambong, Holland Village Menu, Mu Parlour, Lorong Mambong, Holland Village

MU Parlour in the space previously occupied by Anthropology at 16A Lorong Mambong – a decent cup of MU Blend No. 21, not quite as citrusy or chocolatey as described but really quite decent; and

Counter, Strangers' Reunion, Kampong Bahru Road Retro Seating, Strangers' Reunion, Kampong Bahru Road
Flat white and red velvet cupcake, Strangers' Reunion, Kampong Bahru Road
Strangers' Reunion, Kampong Bahru Road Yoghurt with granola, Strangers' Reunion, Kampong Bahru Road
Flat White, Strangers' Reunion, Kampong Bahru Road Lychee martini cake, Strangers' Reunion, Kampong Bahru Road

Strangers’ Reunion (facebook) at 37 Kampong Bahru Road (just a few doors down from Highlander Coffee), where Ryan Kieran Tan helms a Synesso Hydra II 3 Group, the first of its kind in Singapore (HT: Colin Loh), and takes Papa Palheta‘s Terra Firma blend to the bright side.

Coffee hasn’t begun to fetch the sort of prices that result in the coffee equivalent of dodgy DRCs. But come to think of it, brinksmanship, character assassination (by both the incumbent and the opposition), conveying words that are technically accurate but intentionally set in a context that encourages the hearer to understand them to mean something else etc, are all variations on fraud, yet are par for course in social, political intercourse.

I was trying to explain this, over lunch, to a pastor recently: if God is a God who is insistent that humans should have faith in him and trust him because he is unfailingly trustworthy and his words are always true, then we who profess to follow him must not be any different. The command not to bear false witness (Exodus 20:16, Exodus 23:1, Deuteronomy 5:20) isn’t to be read restrictively just to mean not to say anything untrue in a court of law, but that one’s whole character must be one of integrity (cf. Matthew 5:33-37).

There has arisen a strange practice in some Christian circles where a more knowledgeable member of a bible study group asks questions of the leader, giving the impression that she would like to be enlightened, when she actually hopes that others will benefit by her query. The motive for this is a good one, but the constant practice of this sort of behaviour does not help in building trustworthy character. This became evident recently when I asked one of these helpful people about something she had said to someone else, her first instinct was to deny vehemently that she had ever said anything at all, though this was later shown to be untrue.

This is why Paul was keen to emphasise his trustworthiness (and therefore the trustworthiness of God’s word through him):

…we have renounced disgraceful, underhanded ways. We refuse to practice cunning or to tamper with God’s word, but by the open statement of the truth we would commend ourselves to everyone’s conscience in the sight of God. (2 Corinthians 4:2 ESV)

In inviting people to events where the gospel will be preached, it appears to be the common practice to downplay the talk and emphasise the good music or the fantastic meal as the main attraction. Before i became a Christian, i was leery of this sort of trickery; and now i realise it possibly dishonours the very God we claim to exalt.

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  1. April 13, 2012 at 1:03 am

    You are fast! I just read about Mu last week. So the hair salon used to share the same level with Plain Vanilla is now gone?

  2. April 13, 2012 at 8:29 am

    Hmmm, nope i think that one is still there. MU is in the row of shophouses facing the food centre, whereas the hair place faces the row of shops with Wala Wala at the end. Where did you read about MU? i spotted it after returning some rentals at VideoEZY. 🙂

  3. April 13, 2012 at 10:52 am

    I see… i think i saw it in some magazine while sipping coffee at smitten :p

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